You forget what it was like. In April and even in May I was fretting that the garden wasn’t looking good, that things weren’t coming back, that I’d ruined things.

Grape arbor, May 17. OMG DID I PRUNE IT TOO MUCH? WHERE IS MY SHADE??

 

Grape arbor, June 11, just before I had to cut it back again.

May 17, will there be ANY grapes this year?!

June 19, grapes coming in.

May 17, north bed still a mess from winter.

June 19, north bed planted with peppers, eggplant, zucchini, and mulched.

Center garden in bloom May 17, lavender on right of plot, patchy thyme, beans just planted along fence.

June 11, lavender explosion!, thyme filled in, beans starting to climb along the fence.

 

So, don’t forget to take pictures, kids!

 

in bloom

April 22, 2012

Sunday tour of stuff in bloom, before the nor’easter gets here.

First, there seems to be a lot of aquilegia around, even though I only remember planting one. I think it’s origami mix, blue and white, though there are so many types of aquilegia, it’s hard to tell.

This is some wild that appeared by the fence. It looks like black barlow?:

What’s more, this seems to have seeded from somewhere:

And since it’s kind of smothering the English violas, I might pull it out.

There is the blue phlox I was talking about before, going gangbusters:

Some blanket flowers are already starting:

The lilac bush is opening!

The pagoda bush is in bloom for the first time.

Its little blossoms:

Finally, the knockout roses seem to be thriving after heavy pruning this winter:

 

It’s easy to get so focused on all the spring chores that you fail to pay enough attention to the things coming back to life and blossoming. Here are some highlights from the messy-in-progress-chaos-garden.

The wisteria looks like it’s fixin’ to bloom for the very first time! Down near the container:

And up on the wire!

close up for you:

A few snapdragons survived the winter and are blooming again:

Guess I must have put some Johnny Jump-up seeds in here last year:

The Dame’s Rocket is fixin’ to bloom for its very first time after being planted from seed two years ago:

The brussels sprouts never put up a proper stalk of sprouts, but it’s got little flowers on it now, aw:

And of course the most important thing is that the family got built back up again last fall, and now we have Oona! Here she is this weekend at Prospect Park, 10 months old:

building the family up

September 19, 2011

We had a terrible time last week because Scout, our Irish Wolfhound, died.

She had a long life for a wolfhound (9 years, 4 months), but it was just awful. Now the family is down to just us two.

We have had a hard time doing much besides crying and feeling lost in our now too-big house. But, as my mom said, you just have to build your family back up again. We’re looking for a puppy, and there’s not much we can do about the human side, but it’s never a bad time to build up the family outside.

We got two lovely little heather plants and put them in some pots that were waiting for something special. They’re hardy and semi-evergreen, so hopefully they’ll do well.

While I was next door at Crest getting the heather plants, Guru Vincent asked after the plant pockets and wondered if we might find a home in them for a couple of sad little succulents they couldn’t sell. Adoption immediate!

Unknown how they’ll do, but they sure look cute now.


Thanks, Vincent!

The hardy mums from last year are blooming again, bless ’em:

We hope, believe, and see that death is not the final answer.

The weather has been unspeakable, and it has been hard to tolerate being outside for longer than it takes to keep things alive via watering. So I can’t say I’ve been enjoying the garden much lately. But, tonight it was ever-so-slightly cooler, so we had a little poke around at evening watering and discovered these modest news items.

The other clematis, which had protested its first location by trying to die, has revived in its new pot and is flowering.

 

Some purply pink flowers whose names I forgot have done all right in the heat.

 

Some late basil seedlings did not bake to death and are ready to go in the ground shortly.

 

The wisteria has developed a plan for itself. It has decided to blow off the grape arbor and go straight up the power line. Day by day it has been getting closer to its goal, and it looks like tomorrow or the next day it will reach the top.

Wouldn’t it be cool if it survived the winter up there and then blossomed in the spring?

 

Finally, the moonflower is producing its huge, nearly pornographic blossoms.

 

I’m particularly pleased with this number since it came from one seed I found this spring in a dried up flower on last year’s vine. These blossoms open in the evening and twist up again in the daytime. So very secretive…