It’s easy to get so focused on all the spring chores that you fail to pay enough attention to the things coming back to life and blossoming. Here are some highlights from the messy-in-progress-chaos-garden.

The wisteria looks like it’s fixin’ to bloom for the very first time! Down near the container:

And up on the wire!

close up for you:

A few snapdragons survived the winter and are blooming again:

Guess I must have put some Johnny Jump-up seeds in here last year:

The Dame’s Rocket is fixin’ to bloom for its very first time after being planted from seed two years ago:

The brussels sprouts never put up a proper stalk of sprouts, but it’s got little flowers on it now, aw:

And of course the most important thing is that the family got built back up again last fall, and now we have Oona! Here she is this weekend at Prospect Park, 10 months old:

fall planting

September 1, 2011

I’ve never planted a second harvest before, but this year I decided to give it a try because 1) Crest is currently flogging some fall vegetable seedlings that look really cute in the container they planted; 2) the purple beans pretty much gave up in the heatwave last month, so I decided to evict them and see if someone else could put out for me. Compared to my trauma over the potential loss of the grapes, this strikes me as a more robust attitude towards death in the garden.

Having consulted, of course, with Guru Vincent, Guru Regina, and Guru Clark, I decided to try some broccoli and brussels sprouts here, in the former purple-bean-bed:

The bigger brussels sprout plant towards the front is one I grew from seed this spring. I’ve never had luck with brussels sprouts from seed, and really this one isn’t all that much farther along than the new seedlings. Obviously, it was a mistake to try seeds in the spring when they’re really a fall plant. It remains to be seen if there’s enough heat left in the season to grow these guys.

I also got one of the felt containers from Crest and used it for some kale (center) and collards (ringing round).

This is also the time to get your out-of-bloom perennials on sale. I took a Culver’s Root plant for the perennial garden, to give the center a little height next summer.

And a Pagodatree bush, which I put in one of the cool pots I got on sale at Paley’s this summer.

Otherwise, the late planted potatoes seem to be on track for a late fall harvest:

The tomato beds are chaotic and wild:

Those basil seedlings are looking good:

But some of the creeping thyme (mostly the wooly thyme) has not thrived, boo:

It’s pretty close to where I tore out the beans, so maybe it will get the hint and shape up. If not, I have plenty of other creeping thyme wot I will transplant over there. Hear?!